Acropolis of Athens

The Acropolis of Athens is one of the world’s most recognized historical treasures and is included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. There’s nothing I can tell you about it in this blog post that you don’t already know or can’t find through an authoritative source. What I can do, though, is tell you how I felt about it.

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That’s the Acropolis (on the right) as seen from the Temple of Olympian Zeus near the end of my first full day in Athens. I had been waiting for more than a week to visit the Acropolis because I wanted to do so with my colleagues and students from West Texas A&M University, who arrived later for their Study Abroad adventure (I was already in Greece for an academic conference).

The site itself — even with the restoration work — is breathtaking, and I mean that literally for me because I’m really nervous around high places. It took a few moments to settle in and appreciate the views of the city. Other travelers know this: it’s so satisfying to finally see something in person, especially when it’s something you’ve been familiar with since discovering the stories of Greek gods and taking your first Western Civilization class.

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Bonus Photo!

A for Athens has a rooftop bar with an outstanding view of the Acropolis at night.

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Comments
3 Responses to “Acropolis of Athens”
  1. John Kanelis says:

    I haven’t researched this tidbit to verify its accuracy, but while in Athens in 2003 I heard an anecdote concerning the Nazi occupation of Greece in the spring of 1941. The Germans instructed a Greek gentleman to take down the Greek flag atop the Acropolis and hoist the Swastika in its place. The fellow struck the Greek flag, wrapped himself in it and then plunged to his death from the Acropolis. That, I was told, was the beginning of the Greek resistance movement, which lasted until 1944 when the Germans retreated from the country.

  2. John Kanelis says:

    I have so enjoyed the pictures you’ve been posting from your trip.

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